+20

I’m planning on getting a degree in Computer Science when I get to college. Is this a good idea?

I’m thinking of getting a degree in computer science when I get to college. For those of you who know me on SoloLearn, do you think that is a good idea or do you think a degree in something else would be a better match for me? Also, a degree in what field can get me hired in the highest paid programming jobs? Computer Science?

11/11/2019 2:18:10 AM

Jason Stone [14 yrs old]

52 Answers

New Answer

+17

Computer science is a good option for a degree. Better job prospects than literature for example.

+13

Surely good. You should now work hard to achieve your aim. Best of luck 😄

+11

+6

https://github.com/ossu/computer-science/blob/dev/README.md

+6

Computer science is one of the fastest growing fields in the international and US markets and a computer science (CS) degree is a great way to break into this lucrative industry.

+6

The pay will really depend on what is in demand when you graduate. Computer science is broad enough for you to specialise later if required.

+5

When you build your own OS one day, come and tell us on SL about it.

+4

In addition to help you become a programmer, I think it helps you to become a more logical person.

+3

Haris yeah math and physics fit me pretty well, and if you’re grouping in CS with them I guess it probably fits me pretty well too. Rora I’m not so into biomedical engineering (what is that field? is it designing things like pace-makers and robotic prosthetics?). I’m much more into general programming and mathematics. In terms of the programming, I like physics and graphics engines, and want to build my own OS (at least a super basic version) someday.

+3

just know that what you learn computer science is just a tool... #know how you handle the tool(not degree) will determine how great you will be.....

+3

Yep,it's good but first of all analyze your brain first,what interest suits you .Because I am also suffering with this problem.Good luck

+3

I also feel like I need to analyse my brain sometimes.

+3

Jason Stone [14 yrs old] Sorry for not responding sooner. I've been quite ill the past few days. It's still too soon for you to worry about choosing which major to commit to for your undergraduate degree. I recommend you keep an open mind about what you want to study and avoid locking yourself into a degree that you may or may not be interested in by the time you start college. Ultimately, it won't matter for you. Your analytical skills are impressive for your age. It's likely you'll be bored with a CS program as you will either know much already or can learn what you need on your own. I would suggest at least a minor in CS or a masters degree if you decide on a completely different field of study in school. Also, your decision should be based on the quality of the CS program you will be enrolled in. Many of the CS programs I've reviewed as my daughter has been applying to universities seem so "meh." Things could be better in a few years at the schools you apply to. Doubtful, but possible. 😉

+3

ID glory I recommend posting your own question with the specific details.

+2

Haris & David Carroll I hope you two can answer this question for me, considering how well you two know me compared to most other SoloLearners.

+2

Cs or maths or physics college degree would fit your analytical mindset I think. ☺

+2

I’m actually thinking about going for biomedical engineering/pre-med. Most of the Biomedical engineers I know program, so maybe if you like that kind of thing you can do it (I love it, I’ve been reading every medical journal I could get my hands on since I was 10. JAMA, CCJM, NEJM, AFP, Emergency Resident, EMRA News, ACEP Now, Medical Economics, anything and everything I could find.)

+2

Monkey D. Velet thanks for the link!

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Jason Stone [14 yrs old] np.

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Jason Stone [14 yrs old] Yes, some biomedical engineers do that, I personally worked on medical imaging machine learning, which is less hardware, more software. Prosthetics is more biomechanical engineering, some biomedical/biochemical engineers work more with tissue, drugs, etc.Depending in what you do, it’s either heavy math, heavy computers, heavy electrical engineering, heavy chemistry, or heavy on mechanical engineering. It’s very broad.