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+8

Operator overloading

Can anyone clearly explains operator overloading with an example?

1/31/2017 12:52:34 PM

Mr.Robot

9 Answers

New Answer

+7

@Mario, To add the age of two persons we can simply use '+'? then why we should operator overload??. My question may be stupid but still I wanna know.

+6

#Daohacker , Give one.

+5

@Mario Laurisch making the sum of 2 people be the sum of their ages seems a bad example though. I guess I will provide an example after all...

+5

Ok, C++ isn't a language I know yet, so it took me some time, but here it is: #include <iostream> using namespace std; class Square { private: int side; public: void SetSide(int s) { this->side = s; } int Perimeter() { return side * 4; } Square operator+(const Square& b) { Square c; c.SetSide(this->side + b.side); return c; } }; int main() { Square sq1, sq2; sq1.SetSide(3); sq2.SetSide(5); Square sq3 = sq1 + sq2; cout << sq3.Perimeter() << endl; return 0; } With this example, you can easily create a new square which has perimeter equal to the sum of 2 other squares' perimeter.

+4

Operator Overloading is used to redefine the meaning of operators when used on specific data types. I could make an example, but i'm lazy... I'm just replying because nobody did yet, I'm sure some kind soul will provide you one.

+3

you use it to define how your self created objects behave when used with operators. let's say you have a class defining a person. a person has an age. now you have two objects of type person and want to get the sum of their ages. that's where you'd overload the + operator. an example is within the course. you could also define that the + operator returns the product of two objects.

+3

well, now I'm interested too. the way I explained it is the way I understood the example in the course. so there's more to it than just defining operations on object's attributes?

0

Operator overloading is very similar to function overloading. Operator overloading is where you redefine an operator so it behaves in a certain way for a user defined type like a class. a quick example in c++: class Point { public: float x; float y; Point operator+(const Point& secondPoint); }; Point Point::operator+(const Point& secondPoint) { Point newPoint; newPoint.x = x + secondPoint.x; newPoint.y = y + secondPoint.y; return newPoint; // return the new point. } then later you could declare 2 point objects, assign them values and add them together with the + operator Point point1; point1.x = 1.0f; point1.y = 2.0f; Point point2; point2.x = 5.0f; point2.y = 6.0f; Point point3; point3 = point1 + point2;

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Another example: https://www.tutorialspoint.com/cplusplus/cpp_overloading.htm I hope it's helpful.