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Capitalize in python

Why does the attached code work properly? Strings are immutable, so why does capitalize work though? https://sololearn.com/compiler-playground/cOKudjn5shxJ/?ref=app

12th Apr 2024, 11:49 AM
Bilbao
Bilbao - avatar
10 Respuestas
+ 7
word = "sunrise" print(id(word)) word = word.capitalize() print(id(word)) #Sample output: #140532121532720 #140532121533040 #Change in id indicates different strings
12th Apr 2024, 1:11 PM
Brian
Brian - avatar
+ 6
The string methods return new values and dont change the original string.
12th Apr 2024, 12:06 PM
Junior
Junior - avatar
+ 4
When 'capitalize' is called on a string in Python, it returns a new string with the first letter capitalized, while leaving the original string unchanged. This works by creating a new string object with the first letter capitalized without modifying the original string. It's like taking a picture of the original string, tweaking the picture, and showing that to you while leaving the original string as it is.
12th Apr 2024, 12:30 PM
`–Ĺ—ā—āŠč®‚Āī‚Āį‚Ā∂
`–Ĺ—ā—āŠč®‚Āī‚Āį‚Ā∂ - avatar
+ 3
So it's like I said before. The variable 'word' is overwritten with a new value. So actually it's a complete new string value.
12th Apr 2024, 12:19 PM
Bilbao
Bilbao - avatar
+ 3
""" Bilbao , Here's another variation on your example. This shows that you can immediately use in the same statement the new unnamed str objects returned by some methods of the str class when called on a name that refers to an existing str object without needing to assign any of them to that name. Being unnamed, those new str objects become candidates for implicit deletion by automatic garbage collection when the statement ends. Some other str methods return int objects. The str object referred to by the name is unaffected. reference: https://docs.python.org/3/library/stdtypes.html#string-methods """ word = "sunrise" print(word.capitalize()) # Sunrise print(word.upper()) # SUNRISE print(word.replace("rise", "set")) # sunset print(word.count("s")) # 2 print(word.find("s")) # 0 print(word) # sunrise
12th Apr 2024, 2:04 PM
Rain
Rain - avatar
+ 2
Anuska Bhattacharyya , word = ["Sample"] word[0] = s # NameError: name 's' is not defined print(word) The NameError is because you forgot to put quotes around s, so the interpreter thought it was a name, but that name was never defined. Even if you put quotes around it, you're not assigning to a slice of word but to an indexed item of word (its only item), and the list will mutate from ["Sample"] to ['s']. word = ["Sample"] word[0] = "s" print(word) # ['s'] Thanks alot for telling me.
13th Apr 2024, 2:23 PM
Anuska Bhattacharyya
Anuska Bhattacharyya - avatar
+ 1
Anuska Bhattacharyya , I think you misunderstand some things. You seem to be saying that "s" and "S" have the same value but different cases. However, those are two different characters with two different values. It doesn't matter that they are related alphabetically. Also in your example code involving a list: word = ["Sample"] word[0] = s # NameError: name 's' is not defined print(word) The reason you get a NameError has nothing to do with slicing. It's because you forgot to put quotes around s, so the interpreter thought it was a name, but that name was never defined. Even if you were to put quotes around "s", you would not be assigning to a slice of word, as you implied, but to an indexed item of word (its only item), which would mutate word from ["Sample"] to ['s']. word = ["Sample"] word[0] = "s" print(word) # ['s']
13th Apr 2024, 2:18 PM
Rain
Rain - avatar
0
I guess it's because the original variable is overwritten by itself.
12th Apr 2024, 11:50 AM
Bilbao
Bilbao - avatar
0
Here is the code to capitalize the whole word word = "sunrise" word = word.upper() print(word)
14th Apr 2024, 2:25 AM
Vidhya Tharan
Vidhya Tharan - avatar