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Connecting Switches to Each Other - Networking

Hello, Assume a company has multiple departments in its building, each department connects its computers to an exclusive switch. Now we need to connect these switches to the internet, we have couple ideas: 1. router for each switch (bad idea!) 2. connect all the switches to one big switch, and the big switch to a router (is it possible?) 3. directly connect all the switches to one router (might not be good if there are more switches than ports in the back of the router...) What's the best thing to do in such thing? Thanks.

3rd Aug 2022, 12:02 PM
Yahel
Yahel - avatar
10 Respuestas
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Mdf is the "Main distibustion 'f' lol" It's the point where the isp gives control to whoever is a tech so anything beyond that point is the tech's problem, not the isp's. AP is access point, they're used in proffessinal setting to spread wifi over a large area. And in the smaller case, you'd need a main switch at your mdf. Then a run or second redundant run to each department. Each department should have their own switch in what's called the IDF. (It's a sub control room stemming from the mdf). From every switch in every idf, cables would be ran to workstation locations for their specific department. Also Mabey a second switch dedicated purely for APs. It depends if the switch is managed or not and also your bandwidth
4th Aug 2022, 6:58 PM
Slick
Slick - avatar
+ 3
No one thing is better than the other. Networking solutions are a case by case thing. But it's usually: Mdf > router > switch > other switch/hosts > hostss/ aps. Can you give a specific number of hosts? Or a growth plan or something?
3rd Aug 2022, 12:17 PM
Slick
Slick - avatar
+ 3
The demarcation point is at the mdf. It's described simply because as a tech, that's where you work. Are you a tech ŌĀ“Įŗę®Ňďd‘Ćŗę® √ó ?
5th Aug 2022, 11:57 AM
Slick
Slick - avatar
+ 2
Yup, Wireless Access Point and Access Point. And it will depend on the needs of your network. Usually the switches will be managed with specific ports for specific services
4th Aug 2022, 7:29 PM
Slick
Slick - avatar
+ 2
Not so much of a device as a theoretical point. There's usually a little box from your isp inside or on the outside wall of a building that has the main service cable
5th Aug 2022, 12:52 PM
Slick
Slick - avatar
+ 1
Ive never heard of it called 'MDF' but I know it as 'demarc point'.
5th Aug 2022, 5:31 AM
ŌĀ“Įŗę®Ňďd‘Ćŗę® √ó
ŌĀ“Įŗę®Ňďd‘Ćŗę® √ó - avatar
0
@Slick Thanks for the answer! My question is theoretical, not a real case that I need to figure out, thus I can't give a specific number of hosts or a growth plan... What do you recommend for small departments (around 10 pc's each department)? And what for big departments (dozens or hundreds of devices each department)? I would also like to know what are "MDF" and "aps" that you reffered to in your answer. Thanks
4th Aug 2022, 8:10 AM
Yahel
Yahel - avatar
0
Slick So is AP the same as a WAP? And is the main switch (located at the MDF) a multilayer switch?
4th Aug 2022, 7:15 PM
Yahel
Yahel - avatar
0
Yahel totally you should check out Eli the computer guy on youtube. I learned a stupendous amount about the networking questions you're asking in just a few hours.
5th Aug 2022, 5:32 AM
ŌĀ“Įŗę®Ňďd‘Ćŗę® √ó
ŌĀ“Įŗę®Ňďd‘Ćŗę® √ó - avatar
0
Slick ŌĀ“Įŗę®Ňďd‘Ćŗę® √ó Isn't a demarc just a device that separates the "responsibility" over the network from the ISP's responsibility to your responsibility?
5th Aug 2022, 12:04 PM
Yahel
Yahel - avatar