+ 2

Beginer Help

int a = 4; int b = 6; b = a++; Console.WriteLine(++b); Why is the output 5?

24th Jul 2020, 1:39 AM
RainbowColorSheep
RainbowColorSheep - avatar
3 Answers
+ 2
RainbowColorSheep •b = a++ is not equal to b = a + 1; b = a++ means that the value of a will be assigned to b and then it will be incremented. •++b means that b will be Incremented first then the value will be printed. •b = a++; -b = a = 4; •Console.WriteLine(++b); b = b + 1 = 4 + 1 = 5;
24th Jul 2020, 2:42 AM
Ćheyat
Ćheyat - avatar
+ 2
This topic is about post-increment and pre-increment Lets take the following as an example: int a = 0; int b = 1; int c = a++; // returns 0 int d = ++a // returns 1 What happens during pre-increment, as int d as an example, the increment happens before returning the new int thus having 1 as the value of d. Unlike post-increment, check the int c as an example, returns the value first before incrementing the int.
24th Jul 2020, 2:51 AM
Jay Gilbert Garzon
Jay Gilbert Garzon - avatar
+ 2
1.Prefix(++a): Increments the variable's value and uses the new value in the expression. Example: int x = 34; int y = ++x;  // y is 35 The value of x is first incremented to 35, and is then assigned to y, so the values of both x and y are now 35. 2.Postfix(a++): The variable's value is first used in the expression and is then increased. Example: int x = 34; int y = x++;  // y is 34 x is first assigned to y, and is then incremented by one. Therefore, x becomes 35, while y is assigned the value of 34. The same applies to the decrement operator.
24th Jul 2020, 7:21 AM
Akash
Akash - avatar