Discussion on Quantum Computing | SoloLearn: Learn to code for FREE!

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Discussion on Quantum Computing

With the emergence of quantum technologies, I think it would be adequate to discuss amongst the community how quantum computing might actually physically happen, how we might implement it, new data structures, etc. Please feel free to ask any questioms, so we may discuss them.

10/22/2017 11:46:59 PM

Quantallax

30 Answers

New Answer

+48

Sololearn Quantum Computing course ? 🤗

+18

For those who do not understand Quantum Computing: As technology advances, the size of bits in computers decrease. As these bits approach subatomic particular size, they begin to exhibit Quantum mechanics (these bits are appropriately named Qubits). Imagine a computer searching through a four digit binary number. (E.g. 0000, 0001, 0010...1111). A normal computer would take 16 operations. However, a qubit can take the value of 0 or 1 or both, so you can simultaneously check all values of a digit at once, requiring only 4 operations. Hence, for an algorithm requiring N operations, a Quantum Computer would only need sqrt(N) operations, exponentially increasing the speed of a computer. Also, you can increase the efficiency further. Due to something known as an Observer Principle, the value of a qubit is undefined until you observe it. Which is to say, it is in all states simultaneously. But due to something called Quantum Entangling, a qubit maybe be entangled to another. Which means, you can accurately predict the value of another qubit. For example, you know a qubit has a value of 0. If you know the other entangled qubit is the opposite of the first, then you know the qubit has a value of 1. So far so good, but is a there a drawback? Imagine cracking a code, and searching through all the prime numbers. A normal computer would take years to crack it, but a Quantum Computer would take far less time (sqrt(N), remember?). If a company has confidential data, Quantum Computers can hack quickly. There is one way to avoid it; fight fire with fire. All countries could upgrade to Quantum Computers, but that would be very costly. Google and other large companies have almost developed a commercially viable Quantum Computers. In conclusion, whatever the future of computing may be, Quantum Computers are definitely involved. P.S. I may have gotten something wrong or incorrect. Please excuse me, I don't know a lot about Quantum Computers. 😅

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Plus, there is the problem of handling qubits, which is a 0-bit and 1-bit at the same time but randomly collapses to either when observed

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We should wait for Quantum Physics to develop first so that we can create Quantum Logic gates, then Quantum Computers then, quantum computing

+12

I love reading up on this new quantum computing one of the reasons I decided to learn coding was to see how this new neuromorphic synapses would be handled. Personally I think a numeric value might be placed on each action to quantify it's importance? Love to hear more from y'all about it.

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Want to play with a quantum computer? https://quantumexperience.ng.bluemix.net/qx/experience. I need to find time to play with it. Got that from a you tube video which I'll update this post in a bit... https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=S52rxZG-zi0

+7

How might loops work using quantum computing?

+7

I feel we might be able to do what I call a "spread"; everything would be calculated at once, as is the nature of a quantum computer, but during the calculations, an order would be assigned to each value, an order identified in the code. Similar to how a for-each loop iterates through an array, a "spread" would calculate each individual element, but would assign each element the index it held in the original array.

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The problem is that quantum computing is a relatively unstudied, relatively new topic in computing

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I like the idea of moving beyond binary to multiple frequencies with more options whether it be amplitude or optics it seems possible?

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Oops guess I kinda meant amps of electrical currents and or frequency of optics anyway it would be nice to work with a base 10 or more than just off on I would think? How could logic gates be constructed with more options?

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Here is a great TED Talk on the subject: https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwj0itbQ7IbXAhUD12MKHYvNB3oQtwIIKDAA&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ted.com%2Fwatch%2Fted-institute%2Fted-ibm%2Fjerry-chow-the-future-of-supercomputers&usg=AOvVaw0XvGrjKKrpzwokocjtjE5e

+6

Yes, they do randomly collapse when observed, but there are ways to collapse them to how we want them (in theory, at least). I just think it would be cool to discuss its applications, knowing what little we do already.

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Small computers. Where the mysteries of the atomic world cannot se normal computing to no longer work

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@JRB Codes Well, that might not be as big as a problem. It's true that we cannot avoid it, but we might turn it into an advantage. Using a transistor known as the TFET, we may be able to modulate quantum tunnelling. Fear not, it'll be under control 😉

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If I may post the question, who here believes we could have unhackable, instant communication via quantum-entangled particle information relay?

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Well quantum computers with few qubits already exist, but it is true they are still not 100 %, so you can also find that they do not exist. But I rather see the bottle half full with respect to science. The theory says that the big use of quantum computing will be in areas of optimization and cryptography and simulations. But many tasks that nowadays computers do would not be faster on quantum computers. Also funny is that you will need right input data, so meanwhile the task itself would be possible thanks to speed up that brings you quantum computing, it might take you eternity to transform data to required form.

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You can use Google's or IBM's cloud quantum computer. I am not sure now about which of those companies I have read. But both of them invests hugely in quantum computation.

+2

I am so confused😧, what's quantum computing about?

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The problem with quantum computers is that the transistor and/or logic gates will be too small, so the electrons can bypass them via quantum tunneling.