Language Usage % (2015) | SoloLearn: Learn to code for FREE!

+46

Language Usage % (2015)

I was sitting here doing my college work, and came across these stats in my book. It immediately made me think of you all, and the types of questions you ask, so I decided to post it here. This is a ranking based upon surveys taken in Dec 2015. Java 21% C 17% C++ 6% Python 5% C# 4% PHP 3% VB .NET 2% Javascript 2% Perl 2.2% Ruby 2% Assembly 1% Don't get hung up on the percents, because you have to realize, Java is a super giant and that alone will make all of the other numbers lower when you're dealing with percentages. As well, it's factoring in all of the languages, rather than just the top ones, which again, causes all percentages to lower as a result. As was mentioned below, all of the languages are good with what they do, where they do it, and how they do it. Like with most things, you'll want to use discernment when dealing with this. Just because the "hammer" is the most used tool, doesn't mean the "screwdriver" isn't important to have. Get what I mean? Assess things based upon what you're planning to do in the short/long term, the platform you'll be working with, and how you want to go about designing it. If C# will be better suited, then focus on that; if Java, then focus on that. This is the best way to approach things, and more often than not, someone that sticks with programming will end up learning many languages. *EDIT* Per Ace, this is updated list: https://www.tiobe.com/tiobe-index/ Per Gami: I just made a pie chart of the new stats https://code.sololearn.com/WxhIMID3fWM2/?ref=app

9/1/2017 9:49:15 PM

AgentSmith

44 Answers

New Answer

+40

Here's an up-to-date listing: https://www.tiobe.com/tiobe-index/

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I just made a pie chart of the new stats https://code.sololearn.com/WxhIMID3fWM2/?ref=app

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@Tristan R Don't get hung up on the percents, because you have to realize, Java is a super giant and that alone will make all of the other numbers lower when you're dealing with percentages. As well, it's factoring in all of the languages, rather than just the top ones, which again, causes all percentages to lower as a result. As you mentioned, all of the languages are good with what they do, where they do it, and how they do it. Like with most things, you'll want to use discernment when dealing with this. Just because the "hammer" is the most used tool, doesn't mean the "screwdriver" isn't important to have. Get what I mean? Assess things based upon what you're planning to do in the short/long term, the platform you'll be working with, and how you want to go about designing it. If C# will be better suited, then focus on that; if Java, then focus on that. This is the best way to approach things, and more often than not, someone that sticks with programming will end up learning many languages.

+12

Statistics stackoverflow: https://www.sololearn.com/discuss/675144/?ref=app

+7

@Ace Thanks!

+7

I think JavaScript deserves more Points 😉

+6

Java deserve it

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@Tristan R You should have your own website with the stats, since you're clearly more in the know than the professionals who actually sit around gathering statistics on it as their job. ;)

+5

I didn't expect C++ to be 6% 🤔

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@Netkos Ent: Will do! Also, connect with me on LinkedIn as well: - https://www.linkedin.com/in/carrolldavid/

+5

I think HTML is a scripting language.

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I wouldn't put too much stock in the TIOBE Programming Community Index. The data used, collection methods, and analysis have been a subject for debate over the years. You can review more details on how they calculate their index from the link below: - https://www.tiobe.com/tiobe-index/programming-languages-definition/. In my personal experience, albeit anecdotal at best, I'm surprised to see Java, C, and C++ still in the top 3 of this index. From a market demand perspective (in the USA), these are not the skills being aggressively pursued for projects ranging from enterprise level to small websites. One could argue that maybe native Android development is driving the stats for Java. However, by comparison, Android app development is relatively small and wouldn't be big enough to compensate for the much higher demand languages. Again, my assessment is based on pure conjecture and is isolated to the USA job market. However, this doesn't change the fact that their approach to creating this index is limited and likely flawed. I would be more convinced in their data collection methods if they extended their data to include statistics from StackOverflow and GitHub at the very least. Additional websites to consider collecting stats from could include the main websites for each language, developer platform websites (WordPress Codex, ReactJS, jQuery, AngularJS, etc), package management websites (NPM, NUGET, Maven, Composer), development job sites for popular job openings, and LinkedIn for skills listed. As a final note, my intention isn't to debunk this index. Rather, it is to encourage people to think about data in general and challenge what doesn't make sense.

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hey guys....here's the latest rankings https://www.sololearn.com/discuss/677542/?ref=app

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@David C... I'll try still more or less new to solo learn so not sure how to do that. But I'll try.

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@Rosen Nikolov this is the write code https://code.sololearn.com/W6r0NM2kSfAd/?ref=app

+3

wow

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For those wondering about numbers, read the second post I made toward the top; it explains how percentages work, especially when you have a lot of elements making up the 100%. It's just simple math and our brain trying to relate the numbers so when our brain reads 2% it's like WHOA! THATS ONLY ONE MORE THAN ONE! THAT MUST NOT BE A LOT!.... But as an example, what's 2% of a trillion? It's like 20 billion or something. If they were not comparing all of the languages listed, and for example, only compared the top ones, all of the percentages would be higher. Again, Java is a super giant, so their numbers inevitably lower the percent on all of the other languages because they are simply the majority. It's no debate about Java, even to the extent that Java's splash screen loves to remind you about how many people use Java. @David C Love your perspective, and I agree, question everything. From my personal experience, the main languages that I see in demand here are Java, C++, and Python. However, I can't speak for other areas since I'm in Atlanta, and maybe that's just what we're in need of. I haven't done the proper labor research to know any actual statistics on it however. What type of work do you do bro?

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@Netkos Ent: As I was reading your comment about the demand in your area being Java, C++, and Python, I was curious about what part of the world you were in. I was mind blown when you clarified it was in Atlanta... which is the market I live in. LOL First, it's awesome to meet a fellow resident of the Atlanta area here on SoloLearn. Technology has a way of making our large world very small. Second, the fact that we have completely different perspectives of what we understand to be in demand from our personal experiences, within the same market, goes to show just how unreliable anecdotal data can be. As a full stack / multi-stack developer with experience in a wide range of platforms and frameworks, the jobs that are constantly presented to me are C#, JavaScript (NodeJS / Client UI), mobile app (native / transpiled / hybrid), and Python. I do get approached for Java gigs quite a bit as well. However, these only represent about a tenth of the jobs presented to me. I actually get more requests for development in PHP for WordPress and Sugar CRM than I do for Java.

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@David C Haha! Very awesome man. Small world indeed. What part are you in? I'm actually right off Roswell Rd / 285. So damn happy the bridge on 85 is fixed. lol :D You're right, it's funny how different the perspective can be with it. For myself, I'm mostly dealing with C# and Java for our applications, and APEX for SalesForce stuff. However, most of what I do is with the software engineering/business intelligence. When I was considering moving on to another company a year or so ago, I was mostly seeing demand for Java above anything else, but then again, I was also searching for stuff similar to what I had done. If I was looking front/back-end web developing, I'm sure it would have looked a lot different to me, but I suppose a lot depends upon where our focus goes with our perception. Really good to see a neighbor on this website also. Hit me up on Gmail sometime, maybe we can collab on some projects later or just shoot the shit if nothing more.

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I think it's important for those getting started in their career to be aware that demand for skills go well beyond languages. Quite honestly, languages play a very small part of the job. Understanding interoperability and how systems integrate with one another, scalable architecture, design patterns, workflow toolsets, test driven development, and good coding practices are so important. As the tech lead who runs an agile product development team, we have to target talented people with a high aptitude for learning far more than we consider specific language experience. Assembling a team of software polyglots allow us to work with a wider range of technologies without skipping a beat or compromising quality and design standards. For those curious, my team is currently working with .NET Core (using C#) and ReactJS (with Redux and React Router) as our core tech stacks. However, over the course of the past year, we've implemented prototypes, micro-services and other solutions using NodeJS, Ruby, Python, Haxe, and dare I say (ActionScript 3 - yuck...). For databases, we've worked with Mongo, MS SQL Server, MySQL, PostGreSQL, Neo4J, and EventStore. From an architectural standpoint, we've leveraged RabbitMQ as a bus to manage async message processing, JSON Web Tokens for claims based access, docker containers, and various subscriber services to manage long running sagas. From a workflow perspective, we leverage TeamCity and OctoDeploy for continuous integration and deployment, GitHub, Slack, Selenium for functional tests, various unit test frameworks, WebPack, Jira, and so on. There is so much more to add to this. The point of sharing this is to illustrate the very wide range of skills developers have to look forward to learning. Don't worry about not knowing these things yet. Just focus on the fundamentals and remain flexible and adaptable as you gain more and more experience.