I hate maths , but i love computer too . Someone told me that you should master your maths for learning Python , is that true ? | Sololearn: Learn to code for FREE!

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I hate maths , but i love computer too . Someone told me that you should master your maths for learning Python , is that true ?

Is here anyone Python master to explain the situation to me .

7/28/2021 7:32:10 PM

NARUTO UZUMAKI

33 Answers

New Answer

+37

Overall, the more math that you know, the better able you are to think upon problems and resolutions for them. It's not absolutely necessary to be a master at math, but the more math you do know, the better you'll be overall. Someone that doesn't know math isn't thinking of the problems on the same level as someone that's a master at math and thus will be limited by the solutions they use or end up relying upon someone else. As AJ mentioned, there are different fields that programming is used for and some fields it'd be better to know math with. For example, mastering calculus has helped me out a great deal with programming video games. I'm curious though, why do you hate math or hate the idea of getting better at math? Programming requires a lot of learning, effort, practice and time in order to master it also. Naturally, I wasn't gifted with the ability to easily do math like some other people. However, in order to achieve what I wanted, I had to put in the extra work so that I could turn my math weakness into a strength. I kept failing math over and over until I began to understand it better and pass it. It's difficult for some people, but it's worth putting in the work to get better at it. Either way, wish you the best with what you're wanting to do! Don't let anything stand in your way and turn your weaknesses into your strengths.

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Everything is a number to a digital computer. If you can't model the problem mathematically then you can't write a program for it. The level of math that will be required will be directly proportional to the complexity of the problem. The more complex the problem the more math you will need to know. To become a professional software developer you will require a firm grasp of secondary school (high school) math at a minimum. Companies usually require degree qualified candidates for programming jobs, and universities typically require math qualifications for entry into CS degree courses. You can learn the syntax of a programming language without a firm grasp of mathematics, however, your ability to solve problems will be limited by your knowledge of maths. Maybe learning to program will peak your interest in math as you can actually see an application for it rather than learning it as an abstract subject.

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@BootInk, Math does not need computers. The ancient Greeks, Persian, and Indian mathematicians were using math long before computers were invented. Here is a list of just a few notable mathematicians who were born before computers were invented. Pythagoras c.570 BC - 495 BC Euclid c.323 BC - 283 BC Archimedes c.287 BC - 212 BC Aryabhata c.476 - 550 Muhammad ibn Musa al-Khwarizmi c.780 - 850 Fibonacci c.1170 - 1250 Isaac Newton 1643 - 1727 Leonhard Euler 1707 - 1783 Joseph-Louis Lagrange 1736 - 1813 Carl Friedrich Gauss 1777 - 1855 George Boole 1815 - 1864 Albert Einstein 1879 - 1955 Srinivasa Ramanujan 1887 - 1920 Did you think we just sat around banging rocks together until the digital computer was invented?

+8

NARUTO UZUMAKI It is not necessary to be a master in math but as python can be use for data visualization so discrete mathematics may help here.

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@BootInk I don't think most downvoted you because of the point, but because of the way that you went about making the points. You make your points in a way that comes off as arrogant and condescending and then only make half points that doesn't fully elaborate upon what you're trying to explain and many of which aren't entirely accurate/appropriate in the context of this discussion. In the end, what you were trying to say got lost because you were more focused on trying to be right about something than trying to address the question that they actually had. That's the issue with people that's really good at math, 2 + 2 doesn't equal good people skills. lol I do that sometimes also so I don't fault you, but it's worth noting. Anyways, since you brought it up, I do agree with many points you were trying to make. Computers (things that handle computations, not just digital/electronic computers) is certainly based around the need to handle more complex math and is the reasoning of their initial creation. All the other things we used modern computers for was just an after-effect of their creation. As many pointed out, a basic understanding of math is usually more than most would need, but an advanced knowledge of math greatly improves your abilities as a programmer because of the understanding and means of resolve that it provides you. That isn't to say that you need to be so good that you can work advanced math out in your head, but that you need to understand the concepts. Most aren't applying concepts they're not even aware of or have knowledge of. I could give someone a scientific calculator and tell them to solve some advanced calculus problem, but if they're not even aware of calculus then they won't make proper use of the scientific calculator to solve the problem either; that's due to lack of understanding/knowledge of calculus. You are right though, many people won't require that, but depending upon the field they enter, they may. I'm rough around the edges also so I get it bro. Wish you the best.

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Bro, you need to be an actual mathematician if you want to be a real programmer and know how everything works Otherwise, you're just some fake/partial programmer learning some people's language

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Yeah if you become a data scientist so your maths should be power full

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NOPE ❌ I DON'T THINK SO, CODING = 20% maths + 30% code+syntax + 50% Logic. you're not gonna do all the mathematical calculation by yourself there are millions of people who already did that so focus on logic building not on MATHS. it's my personal opinion

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I think the knowledge of basic maths is enough..... You should be more logical to make programmes bcoz if you think logically then, you can be a good programmer

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@BootInk, I didn't mention analogue computers or other calculating devices such as slide rules, the abacus, or mechanical calculators because they were not relevant to the discussion about maths and writing programs for digital computers.

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Depends on what you are doing with Python and perhaps why you hate math. For example, if you want to understand AI, use Python, pandas, numpy for ML, NLP, and some of the other types of AI, then you are eventually going to need to understand more of the logic and mathematical skills. You may need a better understanding of statistics or matrix multiplication. But, just to learn basic Python, you May be okay For a while. Khan Academy helps learn math. A lot of people "hate math" because of the practice. if that's you and it's just a hate of the practice of math, likely you will be okay studying Python without over coming your hate of math.

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You do more efferts in math.It is important in game development because you want to be talented and powerful educate yourself. Good luck Try to again.☺

+3

Maths is a crucial part of programming, I used to be in the same situation but as I advanced into programming a found that some fields in Python like data science require maths. Find an awesome way to learn maths like solving puzzles.

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@Martin Taylor, yes, you're right, math has been around awhile without the need of computers (you can evaluate basic arithmetic, geometry, as well as calculus problems with your eyes closed in some cases), and that's not the point I made. But I think you miss the actual point entirely, as well as all the people that downvoted my answer. Computers would not even have been invented had it not been for a need to remove the extreme tedium of long, complicated calculations. You could say that computers are an extension of math itself. I'm surprised you wouldn't mention the various mechanical computer devices that were invented for just this purpose back during the dates you mentioned, such as the simple abacus, or the Antikythera mechanism, Pascal's Calculator, and so many other devices used to aid in mathematical computation when the binary system made it's debut later on. It's not like we didn't try to make our lives easier with computers, as simple as their designs may be, hence the points I made.

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Basic math is required

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Algebra was invented before man built a bicycle...I don't know how to solve a quadratic equation (forgot)...but that does not mean that I cannot code it....eg.Algorithms for Fibonacci series are coded by most programmers, yet very few know where it's practically used in Nature...Knowing matrices is not a necessary condition to apply it in code.🙃

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Sanjay Kamath What we're trying to say on here is that.. There is a great difference between 1. A real programmer 2. A guy who's learning a programming language To become 1, you need to be an actual mathematician otherwise you'll end up being at 2. In most cases, 2 can go away with maths except if you're a graphics, game , AI or some other math related branches. 1 can never do without maths, imagine how the math library in most programming languages are made, algorithm like sorting, operators definition etc are inclined from maths. Now I hope you'll get the point between a real programmer (1) and some other programmer (2)

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You don't need to master in maths for learning python. But you should have a good understanding of basic maths. School level maths is enough. Remember interviewer never ask questions of trigonometric , integration, differential etc.

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Math is important and helps to understand the code basically in Data Science as I know.

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Not python master but usually when we code in python, it usually has numbers. You will need basic knowledge of maths. But, if you prefer making a type of user friendly software based on simple codes and nowhere near calculations, you don't need to learn maths. BUT THE REAL QUESTION IS... why you hate maths, I mean, WHY?