Which is the best os for old cpu?? | SoloLearn: Learn to code for FREE!

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Which is the best os for old cpu??

Guys which is the best operating system for old cpu??

1/19/2021 5:40:17 AM

Samrat

24 Answers

New Answer

+11

Use a Linux based OS, with a lightweight DE (xfce, lxde,...). You should also see if the distribution provides a minimal installation. Apart from that, it does not really matter if it is Ubuntu-based, Debían-based or Arch-based, in your case.

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What I now write is my very personal opinion: It is not worth it to keep a very old computer alive and with my opinion I refer to devices older than 10 years. You will often have to struggle to connect contemporary hardware to it. Even a cheap Raspberry Pi 3 or 4 would be a better investment in terms of performance, and it does consume very little energy (some 5 Watts for the RasPi versus several hundreds of Watts for the oldtimer PC). The very only reason why I would keep an old PC alive would be its capability of having a parallel printer port for an old 24-needle dot matrix impact printer.

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Krish [less active] thanks for the ping. Samrat what do you want to do with the OS? Do you want a desktop, a bastion host, a server? I agree with Linux for older hardware because you can still get support from the open source community. Closed system suppliers will tell you to upgrade. If you want a desktop on older hardware I usually run ubuntu 14 or 16... which ever the hardware will handle best. If you just need a linux box to run a few services and provide a landing machine for a vpn or ssh server, I typically run a minimal net install of centos or debian (this really depends on a users preference). For a server, again this is probably a preference, but having spent several years in a data center, I have had the priviledge to see what very large linux installs run, and red hat seems to rule the market. You can't go wrong with Fedora or CentOS (Open RH) if you can't stomach a full Red Hat license (which is probably the case since you are scavenging a machine?). Hope, that is helpful. ๐Ÿ˜Ž๐Ÿ‘

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Use linux base os like linux mint, ubuntu or fedora

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Martin Taylor lol. Z80? ๐Ÿ˜‚ I don't think 1% of us here have even seen C/PM? It would be an interesting research project for any 8 bit or microsoft fans? Samrat another thing that might be mentioned, is that depending on age, you will need to be vigilant with whatever OS you choose. You will likely need to use an end-of-life OS, so security patches are going to be slim to none. I would keep an eye on logs and limit extended Internet usage. It goes without saying, but make sure that whatever you use is from a legitiment source. Keeping an older OS behind a hardware firewall should also be a consideration to keep script kiddies from fingerprinting and exploiting the OS. Happy Coding! ๐Ÿ˜Ž๐Ÿ‘

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You can use lubuntu Or unbuntu Or any other light weight linux distro. But remember don't use kali linux

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The best OS for an old cpu is going to depend on which cpu you are talking about and what you consider old. To me an old cpu means a Zilog Z80. We used to run the CP/M operating system on those back in the day. Or are you referring to something more modern than that? Any command line distribution of Linux will run on any PC type hardware built this side of the year 2000. However, many modern distributions are determined to shove a resource heavy GUI in your face from start up, which can result in a 3 to 5 minute boot time. You then have to wrestle with appalling performance while you attempt to get it to switch to something that doesn't eat all of your cpu time and ram pumping eye candy to the screen.

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my laptop is 12 years old i5 intel cpu . Ive installed various linux os for 12 years .

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This is true that you cannot install any supported version of Windows on legacy hardware. What you should try are Linux distros made for old hardware, which are regularly updated. So at first, it depends upon your hardware. If you are running on below 2 gb Ram, I suggest you Kubuntu. If you're running under 1 gb, I suggest you Lubuntu. If you are on 512 mb ram, I suggest you Raspbian (Although it's made for Raspberry pi, a compaitable Debian based iso is available for legacy hardware). In some cases, if you are on below 256 mb ram, you should install Slax. In rare cases, if you are on 64-128mb ram, you should use Slitaz Linux. And, in the last, our hope is only Tiny Core Linux, which can run on as little as 8 mb ram.

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I am using lubuntu but some times this os is not responsiding so please suggest another os I also used puppy linux but in this os not additional facilities for developers

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Ok sadhika I will try fedora tommarrow

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S.L. Sashika Sandeepa Damseth fedora is very heavy os

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but it has so many tools for developers if you like you can install it.

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Kode Krasher See if you can help him

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๋ฐ•์ˆ˜๊ทผ my pc is old processor is intel v pro

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Samrat you might read this: https://www.windowscentral.com/intel-vpro You have embedded management and a TPM chip which is going to cater to Windows specifically. You can get linux to run, but it comes with vulnerabilities that you can not manage without hacking the chipset thru software and hardware research, and it likely is going to be unstable. It was specifically designed to be a corporate IT managed machine. I second Jan Markus opinion: Raspberry Pi would make a nice replacement, even though it would take some DIY to make it mobile. I have a rPi 4 with a 10" touch screen and a bluetooth keyboard that runs for six hours off a 10000mAh (cell phone quick charge) battery. It is not a laptop, but a pretty capable mobile computer that is capable of dual screens via HDMI, and it can be powered by a 3amp usb charger indefinitely. Total Cost about 250$ for a quad core/ 8 gigs of ram, with 802.11ac and bluetooth onboard. The GPIO port is a fun added bonus. Runs a flavor of debian. ๐Ÿง๐Ÿ‘

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Arch linux is best for you. But it is very very difficult to install.

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Definitely Linux. Zorin actually has a light version to run on older computers.

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Folks, if you look at the previous posts, you will see that Samrat has a vPro which is an Intel Xeon core with AMT and Hyperthreading enabled by default. It is a capable machine and at the oldest is a 2007-2008 machine. It is a higher end business laptop, specifically designed to run Windows with hardware remote management... It has hardware features that allow it to be managed remotely even while in a powered off state (As long as it has power--plugged in or battery power left.). It looks like it has Ubuntu and Red Hat support, but some of the features are available only to Windows. The remote management features pose a signifigant risk if you do not take the time to understand the technology and turn everything OFF. It requires research and additional third party packages, that may or may not still be supported. There are several CVEs that require firmware updates as well. *I personally would sell it on ebay, and find a replacement that is suited for general use. That is my recommendation.