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what the goal of object oriented programming ?

I've been learning python using solo learn but I reached this part of oop (object oriented programming ) and I don't really understand how to use it in a program , can anyone help.

7/1/2020 4:28:32 PM

Abderrahim Rhitrif

45 Answers

New Answer

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(1)Imagine that you need to make a program with 10 bots. Without OOP, you will make your own variables and functions for each bot, you will write the same large piece of code 10 times, if something needs to be changed, you will have to look for what you need in each bot and change it, if you want to add something, you need to do this for each bot, etc., and working with a difficult program or large code, this is almost impossible. And thanks to OOP, you can make, you can say, a bot template, and make 10 instances from it - each will have its own variables, its own functions, despite the fact that you wrote the code only once and that all these variables and functions are called the same , then you can easily call the necessary functions of each bot. You can also configure the function, that is, what it will be - it will affect one specific bot, or all at once, and possibly not one of them. In general, it’s difficult, but very useful, I’m doing a Mafia game in python right now (suddenly, who doesn’t know

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Martin Taylor, as a Python fan, I want to publicly say: Python's OOP is lacking. In the beginning, I didn't understand that, but over time it sank in. 😂 In my own short words, an object is supposed to protect the data it contains, and define *from the inside* what can be done with that data, and what is forbidden, by providing methods. If I can access anything from anywhere anyway, the object is effectively not protecting its data. One question though: You wrote, Python is not strongly typed. Is that correct? Python is not statically typed, so you can basically pass everything as an argument, and the function has to sort out if that is even legit. It's dynamically typed, so a variable name is not forever bound to one type of value, but it's just a 'sticker' that can be pasted onto everything. Strongly typed, however, means, that one object can not be arbitrarily read as something completely different - which C for example allows. At least that's how I've mostly seen it defined.

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I agree with Martin Taylor. While python can be used for OO programming, it does not offer the best experience. In OOP, there should be a means to hide data from other classes. Python's does not have a `private` keyword and even if you prefix an attribute with two underscores it can still be called outside the class smh Also, in other OO languages, you don't need to explicitly pass the instance when calling the instance method. IMO Python does not deliver the best OOP developer experience

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So in situations (small code) where there is no need for robustness, Python looks short and easy. But as soon as you want to make really sure, every method has to start with a bunch of tests, like: If arg 1 is really an int and arg 2 is definitely a string and arg 3 is by no means blablabla...

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Bagon An important part of OOP is abstraction. A class should abstract away its implementation details(anything that is not significant to its use). The reasons are thus: 1. Changing the implementation details will alter the behaviour of the class and may cause it to longer behave has a member of its type. 2. If the implementation details are made public. The developer can't know how far the client's have tampered with the objects and will be forced to release new versions with extreme caution because they will likely break things.

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It's better read some in the book and then learn in sololearn because not everything is clear here

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Don't feel bad my guy, OOP is one of the worst sections of the Python course, just look in the comments and you'll see all the frustrations 😉 it helps a lot to take notes and consult them if you have trouble. I personally have a fat binder full of notebook paper called the "Compendium of Python Bullshit Vol. 1" 😂😂😂

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Object-oriented programming aims to implement real-world entities like inheritance, hiding, polymorphism, etc in programming. The main aim of OOP is to bind together the data and the functions that operate on them so that no other part of the code can access this data except that function.

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before object oriented technology there were many programming languages for each. such as language for business programming language for mathematicians from the late 1960’s first OOP style programming language Simula has been developed.Since then Other different majority(mathematicians,businessman) can use OOP Style to program their software.might be Some kind of philosophy of Programming.

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Think about classes like same in video games. But they're not a wizard and warrior, but pure enemy and hero. Also item and etc. OOP helps you to reduce amount of code to write, and gives a lot of helpful features (especially in C++ or even Java :)(.Net)

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Security Reusability

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It’s better to first read some in the book (for example, AbyteofPython), and then learn in SoloLearn, because not everything is clear here

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Granger Thank you so much

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dealing with real world objects like users of an app.

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OOP helps you group your codes. You write the methods and call them specifically. Methods could be anything, just use whatever you can always refer back to and understand. When you write methods, you can make references and check back because writing methods is like grouping your code, so once it's grouped, it's easy to go back to. You can't have millions of codes without writing methods. Of course you can but you won't always be able to call it back while you're going further. I hope this helps. And don't let 'def' scare you. It's just permanent in Python

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By using oop you can implement inheritance, polymorphism, abstraction, encapsulation and much more. The main aim of OOP is to bind together the data and the functions that operate on them so that no other part of the code can access this data except that function.

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OOP its helpful

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Well, python is good programming language.. no offense.. but OOP implementation is one of the weak pillars of python.. and.. people.. should.. try out.. different programming languages.. and then come to a conclusion.. I find.. Java as the best 'OOP language..' (just.. considering.. the OOP part ...atleast for me) But.. OOP paradigm is.. very helpful in.. creating.. all realworld.. software implementations...

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Black Tears please don't do this. If you've tried and can show your attempt then post new question, otherwise try yourself first. Nobody will do your homework here

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Martin Taylor, A card game is not like poker, but a mafia, these are not cards, but a card game, these are two different things...