+11

Has there been any great programmer that's always only used ONE language?

Sometimes when I ask questions about what to learn for what I want to accomplish. People are like "learn C, learn Python, learn java + C++ for that" But what if I learned just Pythin or just C, can they cover the rest? Or are certain language better for certain things . So far I know for gaming you'd want C++ I believe And javascript for maybe front end web development. But I've seen in python it's got sort of a "cross-programming-language" (for lack of better naming 😅) in it. I think it crosses C# if I'm not mistaking, sorry I can't describe it better, I only seen it once like months ago.

9/19/2019 7:27:45 PM

Kidale Smith

29 Answers

New Answer

+6

If you are a great programmer. You know these things are just tools for you. Now to the question. I think you can implement anything in any language if you have enough experience.

+18

[Part 1 of 2] Kidale Smith With these kinds of questions, it's hard to know if the answers are objective and based on experience with a range of languages or if they are biased and opinions based on limited knowledge. I will try to be objective as someone who has experience with each language you listed, as well as, others not listed. First, you can be great at one language and remain gainfully employed specializing in that one language for your entire career. However, you may be limited to specific usage scenarios. As Aaron Eberhardt mentioned, C++ and C cover a wide spectrum of scenarios. However, I would argue these aren't as in demand as others for various reasons. In fact, I've had limited need for either language over the past 23+ years. In my world, I could have stayed busy forever in C# or Java. If you want to know which language has the greatest range of flexibility across all platforms and usage scenarios, I think Javascript wins that designation every time. (continued...)

+16

[Part 2 of 2] While the obvious usage scenario for Javascript has been in manipulating the HTML DOM in web browsers and integration with other systems via XHR, NodeJS has opened Javascript up for more usage scenarios than any other language as of today. NodeJS is the runtime for Javascript outside if the web browser. A few examples include: - Console / Terminal based apps - Windows or Linux Daemon Services - Desktop apps (i.e. VS Code, Atom, Slack, Electron, etc) - Mobile Apps (Hybrid and Native) - 2D and 3D Gaming via Canvas and WebGL WebASM may eventually level the field for other languages to replace Javascript in the browser. But, that's still years out and left to be determined. Heck... you could even use Javascript for database querying in MongoDB.

+6

That's a good idea but you need to get updated with the world. If you learn a language today and tomorrow some other language will occupy it's position. Its good when you explore new languages and relate them with the one you already known.

+4

In the past there would have been really good programmers who would have only used COBOL or Fortran or even Pascal and C.

+4

me...... I still learn CPP whole heartedly

+4

directly text messages me Peter David Carter

+4

Yes, I think so. However, as you go deeper into one programming language, you will feel the need to explore new programming languages to compare them and be uptodate.

+3

It is hard to say because all languages are interconnected to each other .But still you need the answer so we can use python because it cover C/C++ or many other ....

+2

There will never be single language that's the best for every problem. However there are many general-purpose programming languages that are designed to accomplish a wide variety of tasks. A general-purpose language could e.g. be used for a web server as well as for desktop apps and artificial intelligence. General-purpose languages are for example C and C++. They can be used for everything from operating systems and microcontrollers to databases and web browsers. There's basically nothing you can't do with both languages. Yet they might not be the best language for every purpose because every language has it's strengths and weaknesses. (btw. Python has nothing to do with C#)

+2

Hmm... the question is deep and it need a deeper answer. Take for example the Almighty God is the best programmer i ever heard about, yet he didn't write his program in one language. E.g there's diff continent on earth diff language and difference culture which are languages like in programming too.

+2

When you deeply start programming in any language ,you will see the need of another language .It all depends on what you really want to do with programming. Pretty much like python ,you could do alot with it . When asking questions about a programming language always state why you want to learn programming or what you want to do with it. That way i think you will get just the appropriate answer for you.

+2

Between Abhishek Kumar and Alpha5and5 is hard to decide who gave breast answer. Thank you both. And no. Breast wasn't a typo , I like breast weather a chicken or chicken lady and I also like solid answers. 💪🏼💪🏼

+1

I think Bjorn Stroustroup 😍

+1

I think you shouldn't worry too much about that. In programming, you never cease to learn, so it is not such a problem to learn the wrong language at first. Think of it this way: the first language you learn is just that, the first language, and not like in actual mother tongues of the human speech. It is just a tool to get you into the world of programming, and once you're in, it's much easier to learn other languages, because the main logic needed is almost always very similar, if not the same. So don't worry so much about the language you first study, because you will learn others eventually. Technology is changing so fast that you have to update constantly to be effective. But I'm no expert, and I only have limited experience, so please take this with a grain of salt. I hope it's helpful, nonetheless

+1

Yes you can do any one language deeply but with basic concept ....... then you get flexible to any language ..... Learn concept of c then you can easily learn any language like java python etc etc..... There are difference in syntex and some features only.....

+1

+1

And thats cbr [interactive]

+1

I think, during life most of programmers change several languages or use them in parallel for different tasks ... time goes and technologies evaluate, something new appear.

+1

NULL_ptr I don't understand pointers, can you teach me?