+11

ECMAScript 6

So, before finishing my JavaScript course I had to take a tutorial on ECMAScript 6. As I was browsing the internet, I saw that a lot of experienced programmers LOVE the changes, ECMAScript 6 had become an institution (not literally :D). JavaScript is my first an only programming language so I don't see what all the fuss is about. So they added "class", big deal :D. Oh wow, we have arrow functions, that's awesome...not. I'm not excited about the changes at all, in fact, the only thing that ES 6 did for me is added more confusion to what I should already know. I almost felt like I'm learning a different programming language. Not to mention the fact that it's gonna be at least another couple of years before it is fully supported. Anyways, should I try to implement the changes with what I already know, anyway, or I should take my time to code without ES 6, until I'm capable of coding something decent and then jump to the deep waters?

4/9/2019 8:11:40 AM

Vasilis Karapas

8 Answers

New Answer

+14

1. Since it sounds that you are more comfortable with pre-ES6 syntax, I would therefore suggest you start coding with pre-ES6 first. 2. Compatibility is not an issue, we can use Babel transpiler for backward compatibility of your ES6 codes. Thanks KrOW for library Babel.js for converting ES6 scripts into runnable on pre-ES6 browsers. https://code.sololearn.com/WL4QrKP4we6A/?ref=app https://www.sololearn.com/Discuss/1220172/?ref=app 3. QUOTE from David: "In fact, we use the improved syntax for new ECMA features when possible to reduce bugs and future proof our code." (his comment on Christmas) https://www.sololearn.com/post/54322/?ref=app

+5

Thanks, Gordon. I don't know, maybe I'm over-thinking this and it's only a matter of time and practice. Back to the basics for me. As for David's quote, well... he's not wrong. Everything is evolving in a rapid pace, and developers do need to be able to keep up with the times.

+5

I can tell you that I started to love ES6, once I started to learn React.js, it makes the code less verbose, and simple to write.

+3

https://www.sololearn.com/post/86823/?ref=app

+3

As for React.js, I'll look into that. Thanks for the advice.

+3

Here is the code comparison https://code.sololearn.com/W5n5W75yzAG6/?ref=app ES6 or JavaScript way? You decide... Vasilis Karapas What I could tell you is programmers would like ES6 way to code, if they really understand ES6. Take you time to learn ES6 well, you would like it then.

+2

Maybe the main issue, in this case, is that I don't have enough experience with JavaScript, yet. Maybe I just need more time to practice and create more difficult codes until I fully grasp the main concept of JavaScript. As I was browsing through the internet, regarding ES 6, most developers loved the change. However, they were programmers with a lot more experience and with more the one programming language. In my case, I've read the ES 6 lesson, but I don't understand most of what I've read and why are the changes and how are they going to help. Currently, I'm reviewing the basics and maybe I'll start more intense projects that require more JavaScript until I am comfortable with JavaScript the same way I am comfortable with HTML (imagine how much practice that would take).

0

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