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Navbar difference <a> the <ul> / <ol>

What is the difference between creating a navbar with <a> or <ul> / <ol> element, is that I see some using <ul> other <a> being able to create the same style I just gave an example in the navbar because I find it much easier and simpler to use <a> because when you use <ul> or <ol> you have to configure <li>, <a>, <ul> is it a matter of taste? or does it have differences?

2/2/2019 11:01:28 AM

Matheus Batista

8 Answers

New Answer

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I mean not using a list can save you five seconds yes but it's not the right way to approach things. You want all your HTML to be understood by not only you looking at a smartphone, but also bots, blind people using a screen reader, reader mode in iOS and Android ( https://bit.ly/2HJWx7X ), ... and for that it's important to write correct HTML. If you have a list of things, use a list :) You get used to it quickly. Once your CSS files get hundreds of lines long, using good HTML also stops you from going insane. Like when you see `nav > ul > li > a { ... }` you immediately know what it does (and more importantly, what it does not do)

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Adding <a> tags in a <ol> or <ul> is mainly a matter of taste but it has a slight difference. When an <a> tag is inside of a <li> tag it will automatically give the <a> tag the same height and width as the <li>. So if you don't do this you will most likely notice that you can only click on the text, instead of the whole element you put the <a> inside of Hope this helps. If this doesn't fully answer your question, please let me know. :)

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Ghozzi Nassreddine you do not understand the question there is nothing

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Stef Schöningh is not this my question, look she refers to when creating a navbar when we will customize many use the <a> element inside the div than having the job set up <ul>, <li>, <a>

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As always in HTML, pick the most meaningful. If your navbar is a list of things, use <ul>. If it's an ordered list like the chapters of a book, use <ol>. If the individual elements have links, use <a>. Inside the CSS you can turn anything into anything really so HTML should be used to convey the right meaning.

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Schindlabua yes I know but I see many use list to create navbar in the customization issue being that it would be easier to use link as element <a> do not you think?

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Stef Schöningh is not that what I'm talking about, I'm going to give an example to understand what I mean: Example let's suppose I saw a guy create a navbar using list but I managed to do this customization without using list only using <a> because it uses list I find it very laborious because you have to customize <li> and <ul> or <ol> here comes my doubt is there anything special about doing this or is it a matter of liking each one doing his own thing?

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Schindlabua thanks