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Python operator precedence

So I tried in the playground and got this: print((True == False) or True) and the output is True. As I see it, this statement equals this: print(False or True) and the output is True. Does this mean True has a higher precedence than False? If not, what’s the explanation? Also are “print((True == False) or True)” and “print(True == False or True)” the same since == has a higher precedence than or? Thanks in advance!

11/12/2018 2:46:07 PM

Lauren

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True is not operator! "True == False or True" is equal to "(True == False) or True" because == has higher precedence than or. True or False do not change the precedence of operators