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MacBook or Windows notebook ?

I can buy Macbook, and also I can buy Acer,Lenovo, or HP... [JUST FOR PROGRAMMING] //What notebook should I buy?

2/2/2018 9:00:51 PM

Azer Sadykhzadeh

16 Answers

New Answer

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As a proud owner of Macbook Pro 2016 with max upgrades. Here are a few suggestions. 1. If you're using it for programming I suggest the pro one. But it's expensive. Although the experience is really good and advanced compared to windows, it is very expensive. 2. You cannot play games. 3. If your in experimenting stage, windows with Linux on VirtualBox is your goto. But if you know your stuff around Linux terminal and develop using alot of frameworks, then Mac will be your best buddy. Hope I helped. Cheers 👍

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I would go with a Windows notebook!!! I personaly like Lenovo Yoga Notebooks or a Microsoft Surface. I would go with a device which max. has a 14 inch display, so its still portable and quite comfy. And make sure it has a SSD, not HDD. Have a look at the YOGA i7 processor 8Gb ram Nvidia Grafics 256 Gb SSD TouchScreen

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Unless you're planning to develop for iOS I'd say get a Windows notebook and install Linux on it as a second operating system. Apple products are just generally bad products, and you should avoid them if possible.

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It all depends on your preferences. Most important is fast processor(i7 or new i5) and at least 8gb of ram.

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@Krishnatheja I have always heard proud Apple owners say that "the experience"™️ is really good, but they never elaborate what that means. And I've only experienced frustration when using Apple hardware and software. I mean what does macOS add to the table that you can't get in Windows or in Linux? I mean, I hated Windows for a long time for being slow, badly written, and generally a mess, and I still maintain that position. But I have to say, ever since I updated to an SSD I haven't had any more problems with it and the "experience"™️ has been nearly flawless. It only crashed once, and that was when I was trying to install 3 (large) programs at once (with a modest 6GB of RAM). As for Linux I can not conceive of something any operating system can do better than it except for having more software. I am open to the possibility that macOS is the answer to all my problems and that if I got used to it's quirkiness I would be a much happier person, but I haven't heard any convincing arguments for that. So my question to you is, what is your experience with other operating systems, and what do you mean when you say that the Mac "experience"™️ is better?

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@Krishnatheja I'm sorry if I don't see the point in spending thousands of dollars for a jack of all traits operating system when you could just dual-boot and get the best of both worlds. Good day.

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@Krishnatheja 1 & 2 & 3) Yeah, the windows update system sucks, I'll give you that. However the Linux update system is awesome. In Debian-based distribution you have a simple process: open a terminal, "apt update", wait 30 seconds, "apt upgrade", minimize/open a new workspace. As for installing packages you can use apt install. Or you can use aptitude which provides a proto-GUI for installing packages complete with a search function, descriptions, recommendations (as in package X recommends package Y, not as in curated user-specific recommendations) and everything. And it also "takes seconds to switch versions, install and uninstall". Ubuntu has a GUI app store but it's not very good. And no, not every Linux distribution has its own package manager, since most Linux distributions belong to a family: either Debian-based, Red Hat-based (these are the 2 main ones), Arch-based or Gentoo based. Also I have never experienced crashes as a result of updating packages on Debian Unstable. Come to think of it, I have never experienced crashes at all, only rare freezing on my 2nd laptop, as a result of really old hardware not going well with Gnome 3, and I could always get the system back with Ctrl-Alt-F3. Great job splitting this singular point in 3 btw.

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@Krishnatheja 4) The desktop environment is a matter of personal preference (which is why Linux lets you change it, try Elementary OS if you're all about the looks, I like Gnome because it's simple and doesn't get in the way). Honestly, I like the Windows environment, although the lack of a good terminal is disappointing. The good part about it is that is that the GUI has a lot more functionality though. macOS (and Apple design in general) always looked childish to me, made to have flashy colors, and blinking lights, and that annoying thing when you hover over the app list at the button and they all spring up for no reason. And a bad alt-tab systems (although gnome has that too). Also, I don't know may Mac users, but I've heard a lot of friends complain about heavy changes to iPhones that meant they had to relearn how to use them. 5) Yes I know Linux is a Unix-like operating systems. I also know that Linux doesn't inherent directly form the original Unix operating system, so any similarities between macOS and Linux are at mentality-level only. Also, Windows dropped DOS with XP, you're talking about cmd. And that has been superseded by PowerShell. Still not very good, but much better. However, even if I agreed with you on every point. Only because installing/updating software isn't as easy, and you get a prettier looking computer and you get better built-in apps, none of that's worth spending some extra thousands of dollars for.

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@Krishnatheja I run Debian Unstable with Gnome 3 (although I recognize that Gnome isn't very good).

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@Krishnatheja I program with C/C++ using gcc/g++, gdb, make and GNU Emacs, or with Python/Haskell using their respective platforms. I also use Gnome Builder sometimes. I edit every other type of code using Sublime. Aside from that I use the built-in Gnome applications, GNU/Linux utilities and Firefox. I don't do much else (like photo/video editing etc.) on Linux because there isn't very good software available for it. Edit: Forgot to mention openssh for remote control and git for source code management.

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@Krishnatheja. First of all, the days of not getting drivers in Linux to work is (for the most part) gone, sure you might not always get the latest and greatest optimizations, but it works. As for every other thing, you can just dual-boot with Windows, and there you go, problem solved. And Linux doesn't restrict use of proprietary tools (at least not Debian), it's just that almost nobody makes proprietary software for Linux because, well, why would they? And of course there are going to be situations when you're going to have to use macOS for work-related reasons. I mean, if you were working on a program made using the .NET framework, you'd have to use Windows and Visual Studio. But what does that have to do with Windows as an operating system, or Windows as a platform for learning/recreational programming, if we were to bring it back to OP's question?

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@vlad I consider myself as a person with decent knowledge on operating systems. So the following details are my personal opinion and I don't expect you to agree. 1. The windows update = No comments. Linux update = will there be a day without updating?? Ubuntu for example doesn't even let you install a package workout running sudo apt-get update/upgrade So please don't get me started on that one. Arch is good but advanced and hard to use unless you know your stuff. Which I strongly believe you don't. 2. Mac has one popular packet manager. Homebrew. It takes second to switch versions, install and uninstall. Half of the windows population don't even use choco. Linux - every distro has its own packet manager and chances of crashing... Please. 3. Installing software. Mac - drag drop your done. Windows - next next.. Wait for 5 mins. Next next. Linux - is there even a gui for installing. Please educate me here. 4. The feeling you get when sit in front of the monitor. Windows - same old screen. Linux - please. Gnome for 2 days, then you find KDE. Then bungie... Mac - one smooth Ui that you can never get bored of. Though it's monotonous. How many Mac users have you heard of saying "man I am bored of Mac". 4. Os default programs. Windows - you heavily rely on gui. Dos is a bunch of broken commands which doesn't even improve your productivity. Linux - this is the only place I favor it. Vi, grep, awk, just amazing. Mac - did you know that Linux came from UNIX?? Is this enough or you want more?? Cheers 👍

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I said that my points are purely personal and I tried with things people can see and relate too. But if you're asking for a debate, I'm here. But before I start. May I know what exactly you run on your Linux ??

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No I meant what do you do with your Linux system

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Ok @vlad. I'll start with your usage of Linux. 1. Mac is used by programmers who want to leverage its Unix command line tools along with supported, maintained and user friendly products of Adobe, and other proprietary software. Think of Mac like a mix of windows runnable products along with Linux command line features. 2. Installing the correct drivers for your system is a hassle in Linux. Especially when people buy latest graphic cards for training and modeling Ai and Neural networks. This is where windows has a upper hand. Mac doesn't even bother with all that. Note: I am aware of cloud computing but students and individuals can't afford it. 3. When you start making use of your programming / computer knowledge, like me. You grow tired of Linux. Your company expects you to use a software which they provide a license for. Not installable in Linux. 4. Linux servers are amazing. Interacting with one using windows is a pain. Interacting with a Linux system is great. But you get real security by interacting with a Mac system. What I mean by security is not virus, but the activity captured by your browser and system. Try Google activity center. Mozilla is resource heavy. Although I have nothing against Linux. I feel that Mac is a secure, fully featured os(like Linux). But with the unrestricted access to proprietary tools and ease of use in day to day computing. I get the feeling that you don't own a Mac. Maybe you do. But I don't think you would complain if you've used it right.

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You rather have 2 different os when you can get both in 1?? I have of course stated your option of duel os. But the debate was on Mac vs other os. Edit : read my above answers. I tried being reasonable with you. But if your hell bent on your ways of doing. By all means go ahead. Let people use what they like. This is a forum to guide people not force opinions on them. Good day. If you argue mindlessly anymore, I'm afraid it's gonna come under spam and violation of sololearn forum guide lines. Just trying to help you. Good day!!