+ 2

What is the best problem solving approach?

10th Oct 2021, 6:03 PM
Kamran Riyaz
Kamran Riyaz - avatar
25 Respuestas
0
I think what I need to know is still unsolved. That's why no one has a clear point for this question. But still someone has given a basic framework: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/how-to-solve-coding-problems/ https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_of_everything
11th Oct 2021, 5:22 AM
Kamran Riyaz
Kamran Riyaz - avatar
+ 7
There is no such thing. Different problems require different approaches.
10th Oct 2021, 6:08 PM
Simon Sauter
Simon Sauter - avatar
+ 4
Thanks for the example. I think I begin to see what you mean... The concept of computational thinking seems to have some face validity. Sure one may find it helpful in problem solving. But are the methods of this concept really specific? I mean wouldn't many other concepts formulate them more or less the same? On the other hand ‚Äď stick to close to such a concept and its methods could even be detrimental as it takes away some flexibility and creativity. Which takes me back to the initial question: If we were to find a "best approach" ‚Äď what would be the unit to measure how good an approach is? To what extent would this measurement be independent across tasks and persons?
10th Oct 2021, 8:40 PM
Lisa
Lisa - avatar
+ 4
As said theres no unique framework, but there exist some approaches: * algorithmia * theory of computability * complexity theory * control theory * systems theory * calculus & statistics And others. Maybe you would be interested TRIZ (a sovietic framework), it could link with other interesting stuff. Edited: First design/solve the problem; then implement.
11th Oct 2021, 11:04 AM
Kiwwi#
Kiwwi# - avatar
+ 3
There is no such thing as a universal framework either.
10th Oct 2021, 6:56 PM
Simon Sauter
Simon Sauter - avatar
+ 3
But the steps depend on the problem? And here we would return to the point Simon Sauter mentioned. Or do you mean things like "Read the task instruction, do further research if necessary, try and error until problem solved"? I think that's rather common sense. That's why I asked what you would consider an approach.
10th Oct 2021, 7:57 PM
Lisa
Lisa - avatar
+ 3
Some good tips sometimes overlooked -Understand well the problem, if neccesary read it a few times. -Use charts, diagrams, etc to represent better the problem -See the problem from different angles or perspective.
12th Oct 2021, 12:35 AM
Daniel Rodriguez
Daniel Rodriguez - avatar
+ 2
There is no best approach, at least none that would be independent of problem and solver. This is why nobody "has a clear point for this question". And this is, I think, what we tried to explain (Simon Sauter) Asking for the ***best*** approach is probably not how to get the answer you are searching for. Maybe you can re-formulate it or put it more precisely? However, I see you googled and found whatever you were actually searching for... ūüĎć
11th Oct 2021, 5:46 AM
Lisa
Lisa - avatar
+ 2
Break down bigger problems into smaller ones
11th Oct 2021, 9:47 PM
Sonic
Sonic - avatar
+ 2
Something that often works for me is to research the issue and then take a break. Go get a coffee somewhere where there is some activity and background noise, but not so much as to be distracting and let your mind wander.
12th Oct 2021, 1:11 PM
Simon Sauter
Simon Sauter - avatar
+ 1
Even if you restrict things to coding problems there is no such thing as a best approach. Giving up on the idea that there is such a thing will help you more than any problem solving strategy. In fact it's pretty much a prerequisite for problem solving.
10th Oct 2021, 6:44 PM
Simon Sauter
Simon Sauter - avatar
+ 1
Maybe you don't understand yet but it would be in the future or someone had already given. This is my hypothesis. By the way thanks for answering and downvoting! Simon Sauter
10th Oct 2021, 7:01 PM
Kamran Riyaz
Kamran Riyaz - avatar
+ 1
Kamran Riyaz I seriously doubt that you're actually interested in the proof, but if you are, look up a guy named Kurt Goedel.
10th Oct 2021, 7:46 PM
Simon Sauter
Simon Sauter - avatar
+ 1
I'm only superficially acquainted with the theory behind computational thinking. But from what I've seen it has the same issue that all non-formal forms of reasoning (e.g. critical thinking) have: it's inherently vague and uses buzzwords instead of a clearly defined terminology. You can definitely learn something from it (as is the case with other non-formal theories of reasoning) but it lacks both the scope and the precision of a real method. It's more like an assembly of tools you pick and choose from, but you shouldn't think that you get some clear methodology that you can follow step by step.
12th Oct 2021, 1:09 PM
Simon Sauter
Simon Sauter - avatar
0
That's right, but I believe there's surely a best approach to solve a coding problem. It would be better to share our experiences regarding problem solving. Simon Sauter
10th Oct 2021, 6:33 PM
Kamran Riyaz
Kamran Riyaz - avatar
0
The thing you're talking about is the personal approach, that's unique for everyone but there's also a term called framework. So surely there's a universal framework. Now, I think you got my point. Simon Sauter
10th Oct 2021, 6:52 PM
Kamran Riyaz
Kamran Riyaz - avatar
0
It can *literally* be proven logically that there not only is no such thing, but there cannot be such a thing.
10th Oct 2021, 7:05 PM
Simon Sauter
Simon Sauter - avatar
0
Maybe today's logic would be tomorrow's error, what we call the logic is what we can prove or understand but this world is full of logicians. Also if you can prove that it's not possible, make sure to let me know, it would be really helpful for me as well as for the whole world. Simon Sauter
10th Oct 2021, 7:12 PM
Kamran Riyaz
Kamran Riyaz - avatar
0
If I said what I think about that last statement I'd probably get banned. So ...
10th Oct 2021, 7:15 PM
Simon Sauter
Simon Sauter - avatar
0
Kamran Riyaz It would be helpful if you gave us an example approach so we can understand what you mean by "approach" and "framework"?
10th Oct 2021, 7:47 PM
Lisa
Lisa - avatar