Top 5 Programming Languages You Need to Learn

Top 5 Programming Languages You Need to Learn

Programming has become a very popular occupation in the past few years. No need to mention that, on average, programming jobs are paid significantly higher wages than positions in other sectors, and as a result, jobs for skilled professionals are in high demand. But even if you do not follow a programming career path, having an understanding of at least one or two programming languages makes for an impressive addition to any resume. In addition, you become more competitive during this time, when even kids learn programming starting from school. 

Now, when you know that coding is the new writing, you may be asking yourself, “Which programming language should I learn first?” With hundreds of options to choose from and tons of research and lists, it is understandably easy to get overwhelmed.

We have gone through research studies performed by IEEE Spectrum, Forbes, the Guardian, and others, to make your choice easier. Here are the top 5 programming languages:

  1. Java

What?

Java is a high-level, object-oriented programming language, and a popular choice for creating web applications. Over the last two decades, Java has proved to be one of the most popular programming languages.

Why?

Java programs are not run directly by the operating system which means that all Java programs are multiplatform and can run on different platforms including Macintosh, Windows, and Unix. Learning Java programming language will enable you to develop core Java-based server side applications, J2EE web and enterprise applications, and can even venture into development of Android-based mobile application development.

  1. C Language

What?

Although C has been around for decades, it’s still consistently ranked at the top of any list of programming languages used and studied today. It’s ubiquitous, closer to the hardware, and it’s used to create other languages and operating systems.

Why?

It is an important, foundational language that requires that you understand the full stack of the technology. If you learn C, you’ll understand computers at a much more profound level than if you don’t. Some other, higher-level languages may sound easier to learn, but you will be limited by the less versatile languages in the long run if you do not know C.

  1. C++

What?

C++ is one of the most popular programming languages because of its graphical applications, such as those that run in Windows and Macintosh environments. It is an extension of C, and adds object-oriented features to it. Thus, C++ is a hybrid language, making it possible to program in either a C-like style, an object-oriented style, or a combination of the two.

Why?

C++ provides a collection of predefined classes, along with the capability of user-defined classes. Classes can name one parent class or more, providing inheritance and multiple inheritance, respectively. Classes inherit the data members and member functions of the parent class that are specified to be inheritable. Therefore, C++ is mainly used for software engineering and graphics.

  1. C#

What?

C#  is a multi-paradigm programming language. It’s intended to be a simple, modern, general-purpose, object-oriented programming language. It is a hybrid of C and C++, and is perceived as a competitor to Java.

Why?

C# is used with XML-based Web services on the .NET platform, and is designed to improve productivity in the development of Web applications.

  1. PHP

What?

PHP, also known as "PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor," is a widely used computer programming language.

Why?

It is used to create dynamic Web pages, or Web pages that update and display information depending on the user's activity. PHP is mainly a server-side language, allowing it to process Web pages faster and easier, providing a better user experience.

When making your choice of which programming language to use, you should also know that some areas, including financial and enterprise systems, need to perform complicated functions and remain highly organized, requiring languages like Java and C#. Media and design-related webpages and software will require dynamic, versatile, and functional languages with minimal code, such as Ruby, PHP, JavaScript, and Objective-C.

But, most of all, concentrate on the work you enjoy, and it won’t seem difficult to become a great software engineer. Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.

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