using namespace std; struct student{ int roll; char name[30]; char fname[30]; float cgpa; } s[10]; int main (void) { } | SoloLearn: Learn to code for FREE!

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using namespace std; struct student{ int roll; char name[30]; char fname[30]; float cgpa; } s[10]; int main (void) { }

can anyone make this structure in descending order

c++

12/13/2017 7:53:52 PM

Rehan Solangi

13 Answers

New Answer

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it's actually string but there was not enough sapce in question was I write it small

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#include <iostream> #include <string> using namespace std; struct student{ int roll; char name[30]; char fname[30]; float cgpa; } s[10]; int main (void) { } this is real structure and now I have put a code so this can come in descending order

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it's not working

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where???

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I put that in compiler it's saying "no output" which means code is right????

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thank you very much Timon

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Like this? struct student { //char arrays first char name[30]; char fname[30]; //int and float second (they have the same size most often) int roll; float cgpa; } Why do you use a char[30] instead of a std::string? And did you know that if you really don't want to use strings you can make the first char[30] a char[32] since most devices have adress rooms which take 2 to the power of n bytes? Btw Bjarne Stroustrup, the inventor of c++, says that you should order your structs in an intuitive order and not by size if performance is not really critical.

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Ok, then you have the same order than with char arrays.

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I'd do it like #include <iostream> #include <string> #include <array> using namespace std; struct student { string fname; string name; int roll; float cgpa; }; array<student, 10> s; int main() { }

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Fixed, forgot ; after the struct.

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float cgpa; } /*here*/ ;

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Yes, now it's right. The semicolon after /*here*/ was missing until I fixed it.

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No problem, that's why I'm here.