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Browse a library in C++

How can you browse what a library contains and how it is structured, in C++? Regards, Alec

c++

10/17/2021 7:43:14 AM

Alec Fogging

4 Answers

New Answer

+3

Thanks for your feedback, Martin.

+2

Thank you for the reference and info about this subject. I have books like Steven Prata's C++ (swedish), a couple of Bjarne S. C++ books and a couple of other books as well and Code blocks (open source) as editor and compiler, but it becomes a time challenging ritual to start learning C++. So Sololearn in combination with online info and forums, takes much less time and is more effective when getting started. 😊 I also love the logical and structural challenge that C++ provides. Take care!

+1

C/C++ Libraries come in two forms, static and dynamic. Both forms of library are binary files, so are not human readable. To use a library It is necessary to read the accompanying documentation. To use the functions within a specific library it is necessary to include the appropriate headers in your code and link against the appropriate libraries. The compiler will generally link your code against the standard libraries by default. To link against additional libraries it is necessary to specify those libraries on the command line when invoking the compiler and/or linker.

+1

You're welcome Alec. If you are interested in browsing the C/C++ standard libraries here are a few useful links... http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/ https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/cpp/cpp/c-cpp-language-and-standard-libraries?view=msvc-160 I miss the old days when compilers came with real manuals. You used to get a quick start guide to the command line tools and IDE; a programmer's guide; and a programmer's reference manual. It's all well and good having context sensitive online help if you know what you are looking for but it isn't much use for getting an overall view of new subject material. The programmer's guides that used to accompany the old MSVC compilers provided an overview of Windows programming using both the Windows API and the Microsoft Foundation Class Libraries (MFC). You don't see quality documentation like that these days without buying an additional book.