Is the pathway of HTML, CSS, Java Script, then Phython and databases is reasonable for a someone switiching career? | Sololearn: Learn to code for FREE!

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Is the pathway of HTML, CSS, Java Script, then Phython and databases is reasonable for a someone switiching career?

I am career switcher (moving from HR) and aspiring to become full stack developer. P.S - I love to problem solve and so far have learned a decent understanding of HTML and how the syntax works.

10/10/2020 5:32:01 PM

Gull Hassan

9 Answers

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You can only try. Seriously you have to look at the security aspect. You should have a good understanding of governance and compliance? That should give you a head-start on most of the SoloLearners?!

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Gull Hassan Your domain knowledge can be a good spring board for transitioning from HR into a product engineering department of a software firm providing technology solutions in the HR industry. I personally work for a software company that specializes in a GRC suite of solutions including online compliance training content, disclosure and risk management services, etc. The massive complexities of providing enterprise grade solutions with strict, legislative based regulatory requirements to a global range of large companies with EU and non EU requirements has no shortage of innovation. You might even be able to get your foot in the door in a tech support level or perhaps QA role.

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Thank you Kode Krasher. Can you expand further on the security aspect, what pathway you are referring to? Bein in HR within highly regulated industry did gave me huge exposure towards compliance/governance. Every process and HR transaction have to be within compliant parameters.

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That make sense. In other words, I need to focus my search of the software developer job in the organisation focused on HR aspect. πŸ˜‡ Not ready yet, but hopefully will be.

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Gull Hassan I am not a software engineer, but I work with them a lot testing customer environments. So my view is from a systems engineer perspective and may or may not apply. I am just sharing what I have seen. You have likely had to deal with regulatory scenarious related to HIPAA, and possibly PCI. I imagine having worked within the frameworks and having an understanding already will give you leverage on jobs that most people have a hard time qualifying. That is what I was trying to say. Your chance of success always improves in any industry with the more unique environments you have exposure to... Experience Matters?! πŸ˜‰πŸ‘

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Well, I must say, your company does sound genuine investors in people. I do not have the privilege within my current employer, so I would have to rely on starting fresh. Therefore it is a risk, but I am committed. I am happy to even work as a volunteer once I have learned the pathway mentioned above. Do you think, hiring managers would appreciate someone willing to work for free?

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Thank you David Carroll. Your reply is very insightful.

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Gull Hassan I have made a couple lateral moves in my career and it is always beneficial to bridge new knowledge with your existing knowledge. If you have a knack for something, say as a hobby, sometimes you can pick an entirely different career, but without documented experience it will not be an easy transition. I set micro goals for myself and advertise to my managers I am interested in being involved in related projects. My last move from network engineer to systems architect was handled that way. I didnt have to start over, and I had assistance from my management introducing me to the right people. Picked up a few certifications and then applied. I am fortunate enough to work for a large enough company that there is not much apprehension with promoting employees from within. I could see obstacles in smaller companies that have a micro-management culture. Good luck in your adventure. Just remember to keep it fun and enjoy the journey along the way. πŸ˜ŽπŸ‘

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There is always a need to volunteer. You can get documented experience on your resume that way too. I have volunteered with the IEEE at maker faires. Not for programming unfortunately, but I am sure if you do some research on the web or trade magazines you will find some opportunites. If you belong to a church or a special interest group that has a web site, offer to help 2-4 hours a week to get some exposure. It is fun to get involved in open source projects too, and you can meet some interesting people that might present opportunities there as well. Heck, you might find a partner and write the next great HR app? I think the key to any transition is to immerse yourself in the area you want to achieve success. Knowing the lingo, the latest developments, and meeting the right people is going to be part of the career, so you might as well start before you take the leap... just makes good sense?! πŸ˜‰