+5

SoloLearn JS Challenges are not JavaScript challenges, they are math quizzes.

Am I the only one that has problems with the questions on SoloLearn JS challenges and the short time limit we get to answer? Nearly every question I get is nothing more than a glorified math question and it's absurd. Within 30 seconds you have to read the code, mentally manage variables increasing, decreasing, dividing and multiplying simultaneously and then get the answer in. At least make the timer 1 minute on questions that are purely math questions disguised as a JS challenge. Do the developers have some innate fear that people will use Google or a calculator to find the answer? Is XP on SoloLearn really that crucial?

9/12/2019 10:08:26 PM

Soup Master

6 Answers

New Answer

+5

Ok? Let that be up to everyone else. This is a programming application, not a math application, yet all I get are for loops and if statements that rely heavily on solving for a variable and giving the answer. Are you going to flex all of your math skills in a JavaScript developer interview? No, you are not. I've never even seen an arrow function in the JS challenges. It's sad. There are far more tools that have legitimate JS challenges that don't rely on you solving for x or y.

+4

I completely agree, challenges are nothing more than memorisation. They teach nothing, you don't improve in any way and are in dire need of an overhaul. It's weird because outside of the challenges, the app seems to be aware that programing is about understanding concepts, solving problems and creative thinking - how is fast-finger taping on your phone while trying to calculate 10 equations in 5 seconds creative? Questions should make you think about the problem. Getting a quick "a++ % --b foreach(int x in LONGASSARRAY" question doesn't make you understand the code, it's just lazy design.

+3

Not just JS but a few challenges in other languages require math calculations as well. Math is required in programming to some extent.

+1

What's wrong with math challenges ? Math is a necessity in programming

+1

Technically, yes. But they are called challenges for a reason.

+1

I agree somewhat, though I feel that part of the use of math in JS here is to help you memorize what the different symbols represent and how they are used in the language. Also, I feel that practicing solving math problems like the ones in the quizzes on the fly is a good way to keep your brain sharp! It's okay to fail and with practice, it will get easier to solve them in your head!