HTML beginner studying method | Sololearn: Learn to code for FREE!

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HTML beginner studying method

So i wanted to learn something new and found this beauty of an app, a day in and im progressing trough html slowly but steadily, revisiting each lecture multiple times in fear of forgetting or missing something. Im just wondering if that's a good method, and how much work and time should i put into html.I also want to learn css and java script later, so i was hoping that someone experienced can give me some tips. Thanks in advance!

5/2/2019 3:03:59 PM

F.J

7 Answers

New Answer

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I know what that feeling is like when learning: being afraid that you are going to forget or miss something. So two things: first, to help remember, one idea is that you can start your own web code and then as you go through the lessons, keep adding to it. A lesson about adding images? Add an image. A lesson about adding weblinks? Add a weblink. A lesson about adding checkboxes? Add some checkboxes to your page, etc. I don't believe that you will truly remember or understand a lesson until you actually use it yourself. At least that is the way that I am. Second: Don't worry too much about forgetting the details. I learned this myself. You won't remember them all. All that is really needed from the lessons is to know what all you can do with HTML, CSS, JS. Then as you work on your own projects, you will remember that and then come back and look up how to do certain things if you forget them which you most likely will.

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Hi. Anyone has his own studying method. But what i suggest is not to be afraid of starting put knowledge into practice. No matter if you do errors or not. It is the fastest and best way to progress. And there are many persons here who will help you in your journey. :-)

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FYI the w3schools website is another good resource for web related material.

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This could help you: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/Tutorials

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Filip Jovic πŸ‘πŸ˜ I am in the middle of my first practice project code that I am doing after finishing those 3 courses and I can tell you that I keep Sololearn open as reference to look back on those "remembered but forgotten" lessons and also Google is your friend, lol. There is much that Sololearn doesn't tell you. Oh once more piece of advice about the lessons, if you come across any that you don't understand then check the comments as each lesson has it's own comment section. There you will often find people explaining the lesson in a different way and often with examples. Also if you have questions about a lesson, there is a good chance that someone also asked it there and that it was answered. If not, there is always this Q&A section, there are many helpful people here, but a word of advice with this: use the search feature to see if a similar question was asked already otherwise you may get "yelled at" for not doing so 😁

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Think of it as being handed a toolbox filled with tools along with only a quick explanation of each tool and what each tool is used for. And then you go to build something from scratch. You think, "Ok I want to fasten these two pieces together. I learned about hammers and drills. I know that both of them are used to fasten things together but I don't really remember how." So you go and look up the lesson about hammers and the lesson about drills. You see that in order to use a hammer you need to use nails and in order to use a drill, you need screws. Later, through experience, you find out that while the concept of hammer and nails is easier, if you want to disassemble it, using a drill with screws is the better option. So the Sololearn lessons are the tools and only through actually using them yourself will you remember and learn. You don't really know how to use a drill by someone telling you what it is and what it is used for.

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