+2

Thinking outside the “box” or container. lol

Has anyone come across something that they didn’t like about SoloLearn? I finished HTML and CSS course on SoloLearn , though I remember using these two web dev languages in school -used little for projects, for my studies focused more heavily on networking. And I am half thru Java Script course on SoloLearn; it seems to have concepts that are a bit more difficult to get a solid understanding of. Yet I also played with Java to create app on Android Studio for course work at school. Getting more practice is my present goal. THX

2/26/2019 1:15:36 AM

Oscar Sanchez

4 Answers

New Answer

+6

As the saying goes, "when all you have is a hammer, then everything begins to look like a nail". Basically, use the right tool for the right job. Solo learn is more like a taster as it introduces you to key concepts in each programming language. But it is up to the learner to explore those concepts with other resources online. So try to learn from different sources rather than relying on just one.

+4

Well, nothing is perfect, or rather, even flaws can be found in a system which has been heavily optimized to near perfection. The main similarity that I've noticed, among the many threads and responses about SoloLearn not being the best source of learning, is the lack of "real examples", and that a large difficulty gap exists at certain points within the courses provided, e.g. https://www.sololearn.com/Discuss/1017146/ref=app However, we should realize that no tutorial/course is complete or effective without the learner actually practicing and experimenting with what they have learned. Going through the course on itself is never enough. If you face the problem of hitting a large difficulty gap (which exists in almost every field of study), it means that more effort has to be placed in practice for that particular chapter.

0

Dear friend I want to learn c language

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study when you get a chance